Honors Government Schedule Classroom Rules Academic Expectations Academic Honesty Policy Honors Government Unit Objectives

Honors
GOVERNMENT

MR. CRAWFORD

SCHEDULE
BLOCK CLASS  LOCATION
A STUDYHALL KIOSK
B FREE AYE
LIBRARY
WRITING CENTER
YEARBOOK
C AP ECON 22
D FREE AYE
LIBRARY
WRITING CENTER
YEARBOOK
E AP ECON        22
F AP ECON  22
G FREE AYE
LIBRARY
WRITING CENTER
YEARBOOK
H HONORS GOVT/ECON    250

INTRODUCTION TO GOVERNMENT

"Government is the social science that studies the processes, principles, and structure of political institutions and the exercise of authority and the act of governing, especially the control and administration of public policy in a political unit."  - Wikipedia

The Honors American Government course provides an analytical perspective on government and politics in the United States. Students will study both the general concepts used to interpret U.S. politics and the analysis of specific case studies, and will become familiar with the various institutions, groups, beliefs, and ideas that constitute U.S. political reality.

The study of modern politics in the United States requires students to examine the kind of government established by the Constitution, paying particular attention to federalism and the separation of powers. Students in this course will study the organization and powers, both formal and informal, of the major political institutions in the United States- the Congress, the presidency, the bureaucracy, and the federal courts. The functions these institutions perform and do not perform, as well as the powers that they do and do not possess, are important. It is necessary for students to understand that power balances and relationships between these institutions may evolve gradually or change dramatically as a result of crises.

An understanding of United States politics includes the study of the development of individual rights and liberties and their impact on citizens. Basic to this study is an analysis of the workings of the Supreme Court and an understanding of its most significant decisions. Students should examine judicial interpretations of various civil rights and liberties such as freedom of speech, assembly, and expression; the rights of the accused; and the rights of minority groups and women. For example, students should understand the legal, social, and political evolution following the Supreme Court's decisions regarding racial segregation. Finally, it is important that students be able to assess the strengths and weaknesses of Supreme Court decisions as tools of social change.

By providing students with an understanding of the purpose of government, how it works, and the responsibilities of citizens living in a democratic society, this course seeks to create socially and politically informed students who possess the ability to make future decisions that will ensure the survival of the ideals that America was founded upon.

Course Objectives: 

Students will:

     understand the purpose of government.

      know the political theories that formed the foundation for the U.S. government.

      be able to compare and contrast different forms of government.

      understand the roles and responsibilities of the different branches of government.

      examine how interpretations of the Constitution have change over time.

      understand the election process.

      examine how interpretations of the Constitution have change over time.

      detect bias in the media, political commentaries, and political campaigns. 

      trace the evolution of Americans’ civil rights and liberties.

There will be approximately four unit tests this semester and a Final Examination. Grades will be based on homework, quizzes, test scores, simulations, a research paper, and a final examination.


Required Text:

AMERICAN GOVERNMENT, 10th ed. James Q. Wilson and John Dilulio. Houghton Mifflin, 2006.



Robert A. Crawford.
Copyright 1998
All rights reserved.
Revised: February 01, 2010